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August 15, 2018, 06:56:10 PM

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1  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: Today at 09:32:26 AM
Flee and Follow

“Flee also youthful lusts: but follow righteousness, faith, charity, peace, with them that call on the Lord out of a pure heart.” (2 Timothy 2:22)

The first part of this twofold command is to run away from young (new, untested) desires. Sexual immorality is especially to be avoided because “every sin that a man doeth is without the body; but he that committeth fornication sinneth against his own body” (1 Corinthians 6:18).

Two other dangerous desires are identified in the New Testament. We are warned to “flee from idolatry” (1 Corinthians 10:14) and to flee from the “love of money” (1 Timothy 6:10-11). Obviously, there are many “lusts” wrapped up in these categories. They are all dangerous because they are “untested” and deceitful.

Such things will inhibit and injure the Christian. “The cares of this world, and the deceitfulness of riches, and the lusts of other things entering in, choke the word, and it becometh unfruitful” (Mark 4:19). “For all that is in the world, the lust of the flesh, and the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life, is not of the Father, but is of the world” (1 John 2:16).

Such warnings are so common in Scripture that it is easy to become inured to them. But they are critical to a godly life. We are told to “make not provision for the flesh, to fulfil the lusts thereof” (Romans 13:14), but to be “as obedient children, not fashioning yourselves according to the former lusts” (1 Peter 1:14) in order to escape “the corruption that is in the world through lust” (2 Peter 1:4).

In contrast, we must follow after righteousness. The “youthful lusts” can be conquered by the “pursuit” of a godly lifestyle. Even the devil will flee if he is resisted in the faith (James 4:7). HMM III
2  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: August 14, 2018, 08:17:47 AM
It Is Enough

“And Israel said, It is enough; Joseph my son is yet alive: I will go and see him before I die.” (Genesis 45:28)

When someone exclaims, “It is enough,” either a requirement has been satisfied, a need has been fulfilled, or a limit has been reached. This phrase occurs seven times in the Old Testament (two different Hebrew words) and three times in the New (each a different Greek word).

In its first occurrence (our text), Jacob is overcome with thankful emotion at the news his beloved son, long thought dead, is still alive. For a very different reason, Pharaoh later cried: “Entreat the LORD (for it is enough) that there be no more mighty thunderings and hail” (Exodus 9:28).

“It is enough: stay now thine hand” (2 Samuel 24:16; 1 Chronicles 21:15). God’s command to the death angel stopped the destruction of Israel following David’s sin of numbering his people. Later, when Elijah thought he could bear no more, “he requested for himself that he might die; and said, It is enough” (1 Kings 19:4).

On the other hand, “there are three things that are never satisfied, yea, four things say not, It is enough: The grave; and the barren womb; the earth that is not filled with water; and the fire that saith not, It is enough” (Proverbs 30:15-16).

In the New Testament, Jesus said: “It is enough for the disciple that he be as his master, and the servant as his lord” (Matthew 10:25). As His arrest drew near, He told His disciples: “It is enough, the hour is come” (Mark 14:41). When they produced two swords, “he said unto them, It is enough” (Luke 22:38).

There are many types of circumstances that can lead one to cry: “Enough!” But “in the ages to come,” there will never be an end to “the exceeding riches of his grace in his kindness toward us through Christ Jesus” (Ephesians 2:7). We can never get enough of God! HMM
3  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: August 13, 2018, 07:33:39 AM
To Die Is to Live

“For whosoever will save his life shall lose it; but whosoever shall lose his life for my sake and the gospel’s, the same shall save it.” (Mark 8:35)

The principle expressed in this verse must be of paramount importance, for it is found repeated in one way or another probably more often than any other single principle in the New Testament. Note the following examples representing at least four separate messages from the Lord Jesus:

Matthew 10:39: “He that findeth his life shall lose it: and he that loseth his life for my sake shall find it.”

Matthew 16:25: “For whosoever will save his life shall lose it: and whosoever will lose his life for my sake shall find it.”

Luke 9:24: “For whosoever will save his life shall lose it: but whosoever will lose his life for my sake, the same shall save it.”

Luke 17:33: “Whosoever shall seek to save his life shall lose it; and whosoever shall lose his life shall preserve it.”

John 12:25: “He that loveth his life shall lose it; and he that hateth his life in this world shall keep it unto life eternal.”

This remarkable divine paradox—that to die means to live—is also found expressed in many other ways in the epistles. Paul says, for example: “I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live” (Galatians 2:20). Note also such Scriptures as Romans 12:1-2; 2 Corinthians 5:14-15; 6:9-10; Philippians 1:21-24; 2 Timothy 2:11-12.

There are many pietistic Christians who interpret such passages as implying a so-called “deeper life” that is attained by certain Christians and not by others through some mystical experience. However, Jesus did not say to lose one’s life for a deeper life, but for “my sake and the gospel’s”! Christ wants us to live in simple obedience to His will as recorded in His Word, proclaiming in all we say and do that He is Creator, Savior, and coming King. HMM
4  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: August 12, 2018, 09:11:02 AM
Faith

“But as many as received him, to them gave he power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe on his name.” (John 1:12)

Scripture teaches that “by grace are ye saved through faith” (Ephesians 2:8), and that faith (or belief, same word) in the substitutionary work of Christ on the cross is essential to salvation (John 3:15-18, etc.). But faith does not stop there; it grows as a Christian matures. Let us look at some of the characteristics of a growing faith in God.

One who has accepted God’s gracious offer of forgiveness and salvation, one who, by faith, has found God trustworthy, comes to trust Him and His promises in other areas as well. Paul, who had been sorely persecuted for his faith, claimed, “Nevertheless I am not ashamed: for I know whom I have believed, and am persuaded that he is able to keep that which I have committed unto him against that day” (2 Timothy 1:12). God will faithfully fulfill His promises, and we can have faith that He will.

The great heroes of faith, some of whom are listed in Hebrews 11, all had one thing in common. They dared to trust God for great things, even impossible things, and moved out on that basis. Consider Joshua: “By faith the walls of Jericho fell down, after they were compassed about seven days” (Hebrews 11:30). Joshua was confronted with an impossible problem but dared to trust God for a solution.

Then there is the mature faith that can “rest in the LORD, and wait patiently for him” (Psalm 37:7) in the face of hardship and opposition. “For evildoers shall be cut off: but those that wait upon the LORD . . . shall inherit the earth” (v. 9).

At every stage of our Christian lives, God allows us opportunities to exercise and expand our faith. Remember, “without faith it is impossible to please him” (Hebrews 11:6). JDM
5  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: August 11, 2018, 09:06:59 AM
Things to Flee

“Flee also youthful lusts: but follow righteousness, faith, charity, peace, with them that call on the Lord out of a pure heart.” (2 Timothy 2:22)

There are times to stand and there are times to flee. There are some things so fearful and deadly that it is foolish to try to face them at all. The only rational course, when confronted by them, is to flee!

The most obvious of all such enemies is the wrath of God, for His judgment is terrible and eternal. Therefore, His message to all unsaved men and women is to “flee from the wrath to come” (Matthew 3:7—the first occurrence of “flee” in the New Testament) by receiving Christ as Savior.

It is wise to refrain from all kinds of sin, but certain sins have such deadly consequences, even in this present life, that the Scriptures warn us to flee from them. “But thou, O man of God, flee these things” (1 Timothy 6:11). In context, the apostle Paul is here warning against “the love of money” (v. 10) and those who suppose “that gain is godliness” (v. 5). Those who desire to be rich, he says, “fall into temptation and a snare, and into many foolish and hurtful lusts, which drown men in destruction and perdition” (v. 9). Therefore, flee from this temptation!

He also warns us to “flee from idolatry” (1 Corinthians 10:14)—that is, from worshipping and serving any part of the creation “more than the Creator” (Romans 1:25). This warning is especially appropriate today when there is such a wide resurgence of evolutionary pantheism.

Also, we must “flee fornication” (1 Corinthians 6:18). This is a deadly danger to the Christian in this day of amorality. Finally, as our text says, young believers (and old believers need this admonition, too!) should “flee also youthful lusts,” if we are to be able to “call on the Lord out of a pure heart.” HMM
6  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: August 10, 2018, 08:35:30 AM
Vessels of Honor

“If a man therefore purge himself from these, he shall be a vessel unto honour, sanctified, and meet for the master’s use, and prepared unto every good work.” (2 Timothy 2:21)

There are several metaphors used by the New Testament writers to help us understand aspects of God’s Kingdom. “Fowls” make a home in the mustard seed “tree” (Matthew 13:31-32). “Tares” grow up with the “wheat” (Matthew 13:25). A “house” represents the church of God (1 Timothy 3:15), in which are both honorable and dishonorable “vessels” (2 Timothy 2:20).

The first step in becoming an honorable vessel is to “purge” oneself from that which is dishonorable. The Greek term ekkathairo and its derivatives all are connected to active cleansing from falsehoods and defilements, as well as separation from those who tolerate ungodliness. “Purge out therefore the old leaven,” Paul insists, “that ye may be a new lump” (1 Corinthians 5:7). Those who are the twice-born are to “possess” their “vessel” in honor (1 Thessalonians 4:4). Some, like Paul, are “chosen vessels” (Acts 9:15).

All who would seek “honorable” service must be sanctified (set apart) for the Master’s use. “Having therefore these promises, dearly beloved, let us cleanse ourselves from all filthiness of the flesh and spirit, perfecting holiness in the fear of God” (2 Corinthians 7:1). An honorable vessel must be prepared (ready) for good works.

Honorable and effective service in the house of God requires that such vessels must be willing to “sanctify the Lord God in your hearts” (1 Peter 3:15). There is no greater honor than being counted “sanctified, and meet for the master’s use.” HMM III
7  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: August 09, 2018, 09:41:25 AM
Walking in Truth

“I rejoiced greatly that I found of thy children walking in truth, as we have received a commandment from the Father.” (2 John 1:4)

This beautiful metaphor, “walking in truth,” is found only in the two one-chapter epistles of John—here in our text, and in 3 John 1:3 and 4. This principle should indeed characterize our daily lives, since our Lord and Savior is Himself “the truth” (John 14:6), the Word of God that we believe is “truth” (John 17:17), and the Holy Spirit who indwells our bodies is the very “Spirit of truth” (John 15:26).

The New Testament also uses other characteristics of the Christian life under this figure of walking. When a person is born again through faith in Christ and testifies of this by following the Lord in baptism, he or she is said to be raised to “walk in newness of life” (Romans 6:4).

Then, since the Holy Spirit has come to indwell our bodies, to comfort, guide, and constrain us as needed, we are exhorted to “walk in the Spirit, and ye shall not fulfill the lust of the flesh” (Galatians 5:16). Furthermore, we are commanded to “walk in love, as Christ also hath loved us” (Ephesians 5:2). This is not erotic love, of course, or even brotherly love, but unselfish agape love that sacrifices its own interests for the needs of others.

There are still more such exhortations. “Walk in wisdom toward them that are without, redeeming the time” (Colossians 4:5). Furthermore, we are to “walk in the light, as he is in the light” (1 John 1:7).

All of these and other similar admonitions can be summarized as simply following the example of Christ. “He that saith he abideth in him ought himself also so to walk, even as he walked” (1 John 2:6). “He that followeth me,” said Jesus our Lord, “shall not walk in darkness, but shall have the light of life” (John 8:12). HMM
8  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: August 08, 2018, 08:27:46 AM
Vessels of the House

“But in a great house there are not only vessels of gold and of silver, but also of wood and of earth; and some to honour, and some to dishonour.” (2 Timothy 2:20)

The “house” referenced here by Paul to young Timothy is the “house of God, which is the church of the living God, the pillar and ground of the truth” (1 Timothy 3:15). In the Old Testament, the tabernacle and temple were the dwelling place of God and the center of worship led by a high priest from the tribe of Levi.

Now, we are members of the Lord’s “house” (Hebrews 3:6) and are like “lively stones” that are being “built up a spiritual house” (1 Peter 2:5), led by Jesus, who is the “high priest over the house of God” (Hebrews 10:21).

This “great house” has many “vessels” in it of different values. Some are “honorable” instruments (vessels of high value) that serve in the New Testament economy in some parallel function to that of the vessels of the inner court of the tabernacle and temple. Those instruments of gold, silver, and brass (Exodus 25; 2 Chronicles 4) each played a part in the liturgical worship, designed as part of the “schoolmaster” to teach us about the law of God (Galatians 3:24). The more public and formal the use, the more valuable the vessel. The most valuable were set closest to the Holy of Holies.

There are also vessels of “dishonor” in the great house. The tabernacle and temple had “earthen” vessels for certain functions (Leviticus 14). These were expendable—necessary, perhaps, for some short-term need, but not valuable. Since the church now functions as the “pillar and ground” of the truth, the “honorable” vessels are expected to purge themselves from that which is “dishonorable.” HMM III
9  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: August 07, 2018, 09:28:48 AM
The Sure Foundation

“Nevertheless the foundation of God standeth sure.” (2 Timothy 2:19)

The preceding verses of this section of 2 Timothy are replete with warnings about the damage that could be done through “babblings” and cancerous words. But God is unshaken by whatever man might do. “He is the Rock, his work is perfect: for all his ways are judgment: a God of truth and without iniquity, just and right is he” (Deuteronomy 32:4).

“I am the LORD, and there is none else,” Isaiah joyfully quotes (Isaiah 45:6). “I am the LORD, I change not,” the prophet Malachi is told (Malachi 3:6), and there is “no variableness, neither shadow of turning” (James 1:17) in the God of creation. God’s sovereign will is absolute: “The word of our God shall stand for ever” (Isaiah 40:8). “My counsel shall stand, and I will do all my pleasure” (Isaiah 46:10).

We who are twice-born, and thus the children of God, can stand firm and steadfast in the knowledge that He who is “sure” is the One who is working in us “to will and to do of his good pleasure” (Philippians 2:13). He has adopted us as His children “by Jesus Christ to himself, according to the good pleasure of his will” (Ephesians 1:5).

It is no random act of capricious fate that has secured us. It is the sure foundation of the great Creator God. It is His divine power that has “given unto us all things that pertain unto life and godliness, through the knowledge of him that hath called us to glory and virtue.” That calling rests on “exceeding great and precious promises” that enable us to participate in the “divine nature” and escape the awful “corruption that is in the world through lust” (2 Peter 1:3-4). HMM III
10  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: August 06, 2018, 09:17:15 AM
The Presence of the Lord

“And they heard the voice of the LORD God walking in the garden in the cool of the day: and Adam and his wife hid themselves from the presence of the LORD God amongst the trees of the garden.” (Genesis 3:8)

The presence of the Lord can be either a cause of fear or a source of blessing. Adam and Eve were greatly afraid of His presence because of their sin, and their son Cain “went out from the presence of the LORD” (Genesis 4:16) because of his sin. Yet it will also be to many a time of great joy. “For what is our hope, or joy, or crown of rejoicing? Are not even ye in the presence of our Lord Jesus Christ at his coming?” (1 Thessalonians 2:19).

The difference, of course, is the presence or absence of unforgiven sin in the presence of the Lord. Most of the sixteen occurrences of the phrase stress the judgmental aspect. Those who reject Christ’s offer of forgiveness through repentance and faith in His death for our sins will eventually be banned forever from His presence, like Cain. “When the Lord Jesus shall be revealed from heaven with his mighty angels, In flaming fire taking vengeance on them that know not God, and that obey not the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ: [They] shall be punished with everlasting destruction from the presence of the Lord, and from the glory of his power” (2 Thessalonians 1:7-9).

But for those who have repented of their sins and trusted in Christ for salvation, the prospect of the coming and personal presence of the Lord Jesus is one of joyful anticipation, for “in thy presence is fullness of joy; at thy right hand there are pleasures for evermore” (Psalm 16:11).

When He comes again, we shall be presented “faultless before the presence of his glory with exceeding joy” (Jude 1:24) and shall thenceforth “ever be with the Lord” (1 Thessalonians 4:17). HMM
11  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: August 05, 2018, 08:55:42 AM
The Will of the Lord

“Wherefore be ye not unwise, but understanding what the will of the Lord is.” (Ephesians 5:17)

There is no more exalted theme in the world than the will of God, nor is there a more important practical question than how to know the will of God. Of greatest significance is the recognition that it is His will—not man’s will—that is important.

God desires for us to know His will—both His will in general, as revealed in Scripture, and His specific will in each particular decision. The latter must in every instance, of course, be fully compatible with the former, as the Holy Spirit, who leads us, will never contradict the Scriptures that He inspired. Thus, an indispensable prerequisite to finding the personal will of God is knowing His general will.

The general will of God is expressed, first of all, in the fact of special creation (Revelation 4:11). Then Christ became man in order to accomplish God’s will (Hebrews 10:7) as our sin-bearing substitute; “By the which will we are sanctified through the offering of the body of Jesus Christ once for all” (Hebrews 10:10). It is His will that this should provide salvation to all who believe. “This is the will of him that sent me, that every one which seeth the Son, and believeth on him, may have everlasting life” (John 6:40). This in turn entails individual regeneration of all who receive Him, “which were born, not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God” (John 1:13).

Furthermore, His will includes absolute security in Him (John 6:39), our sanctification (1 Thessalonians 4:3), and ultimate glorification (John 17:24). Thankfulness in all things (1 Thessalonians 5:18) and a virtuous (“well doing”—1 Peter 2:15) life are also God’s will. A believer who understands, believes, and obeys God’s general will is then prepared to know and follow His specific will. HMM
12  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: August 04, 2018, 09:06:09 AM
The Name of the Lord

“And God said unto Moses, I Am That I Am: and he said, Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, I Am hath sent me unto you.” (Exodus 3:14)

This unique name of God was given to stress the truth that He is timeless. The name “LORD” (Hebrew YHWH = Yahweh, or Jehovah) is essentially the same, conveying the truth that He is the eternal, self-existing One.

The Lord Jesus Christ appropriated this divine name to Himself when He told the Jews: “Before Abraham was [i.e., ‘was born’], I am” (John 8:58). Correctly assuming that this statement was nothing less than a direct claim to identity with God, the Jews immediately (but unsuccessfully) attempted to stone Him to death as a blasphemer.

As the I Am, the Lord Jesus Christ is, indeed, everything, and He has revealed Himself to us under many beautiful symbols. It is well known that there are seven great “I am’s” in the gospel of John, each of which is rich with spiritual depth of meaning. They can be listed as follows:

“I am the bread of life . . . the living bread” (John 6:35, 51).
“I am the light of the world . . . the light of life” (John 8:12).
“I am the door of the sheep” (John 10:7).
“I am the good shepherd . . . [who] giveth his life for the sheep” (John 10:11).
“I am the resurrection, and the life” (John 11:25).
“I am the way, the truth, and the life” (John 14:6).
“I am the true vine” (John 15:1).

It is well known that this magnificent self-assertion of the Lord permeates the whole Bible, from its first use in Genesis 15:1, “I am thy shield, and thy exceeding great reward,” to its final occurrence in Revelation 22:16, “I am . . . the bright and morning star.” And all these beautiful figures help us to pray more fervently “that God may be all in all” (1 Corinthians 15:28). HMM
13  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: August 03, 2018, 09:16:04 AM
"I Am" in the Pentateuch

“And he said unto him, I am the LORD that brought thee out of Ur of the Chaldees, to give thee this land to inherit it.” (Genesis 15:7)

There are seven “I am’s” in the book of Genesis. The first is a beautiful figure of speech (“I am thy shield, and thy exceeding great reward,” Genesis 15:1), but the others are all names and titles of God. The first of these is in our text above, identifying Jehovah Himself (the LORD) with the “I am.”

The next is Genesis 17:1: “I am the Almighty God.” The Hebrew here is El Shaddai (“God the nourishing sustainer”), also found in 35:11. Next is in 26:24: “I am the God of Abraham thy father: fear not, for I am with thee.” Then, “I am the LORD God of Abraham thy father, and the God of Isaac” (28:13). “I am the God of Bethel” (31:13). Beth-el means “the house of God.” Finally, God says: “I am God, the God of thy father” (46:3).

In Exodus, there are 21 places where God says “I am.” Most of these are merely variations of the different names of God as noted above in the “I am’s” of Genesis, but six do give new insight. The first, of course, is the great assertion of Exodus 3:14 where God identifies Himself as “I Am That I Am.” The others: “I am the LORD in the midst of the earth” (8:22); “I am the LORD that healeth thee” (15:26); “I the LORD thy God am a jealous God” (20:5); “For I am gracious” (22:27); “I am the LORD that doth sanctify you” (31:13).

In the remaining books of the Pentateuch, the phrase “I am the LORD your God” occurs very frequently, but there are two important new “I am’s.” “I am holy” occurs six times (e.g., Leviticus 11:45), and “I am thy part and thine inheritance” is recorded in Numbers 18:20. The great theme of all these claims and names of God is that the mighty God of time and space is also a caring, personal God. We can trust Him, and He cares for us. HMM
14  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: August 02, 2018, 09:39:06 AM
Shun Babblings

“But shun profane and vain babblings: for they will increase unto more ungodliness. And their word will eat as doth a canker: of whom is Hymenaeus and Philetus.” (2 Timothy 2:16-17)

Paul’s earlier warning about “word fights” (2 Timothy 2:14) is strengthened in the text above with a different emphasis. Word fights are “picky” debates started by quarrelsome people. They are useless and divisive. They create conflicts and schisms.

Profane and vain babblings, however, are worldly and valueless “noise.” Less obvious and more subtle than fighting, they have the effect of destroying godliness. “But refuse profane [ungodly] and old wives’ fables [myths, baseless stories], and exercise thyself rather unto godliness” (1 Timothy 4:7).

Because “godliness is profitable unto all things, having promise of the life that now is, and of that which is to come” (1 Timothy 4:8), Paul strongly urged Timothy to “keep [guard] that which is committed to thy trust, avoiding profane and vain babblings, and oppositions of science falsely so called: which some professing have erred concerning the faith” (1 Timothy 6:20-21).

The “oppositions” spoken of are the “antithesis”—the conflict, the stand against knowledge. Paul calls this anti-knowledge a pseudonumos—a false name. It sounds like knowledge but is not true.

The results of these “babblings” are not good. Ungodliness will increase. Error will eat away at spiritual health and truth like gangrene. The two church leaders that Paul mentions, Hymenaeus and Philetus, are listed as examples of such a cancer. They taught that the resurrection had already occurred for the saints.

Peter’s warning is very similar: “Beware lest ye also, being led away with the error of the wicked, fall from your own stedfastness” (2 Peter 3:17). HMM III
15  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: August 01, 2018, 08:40:04 AM
How to Pray

“Hitherto have ye asked nothing in my name: ask, and ye shall receive, that your joy may be full.” (John 16:24)

Jesus promised that “whatsoever ye shall ask the Father in my name, he will give it you” (John 16:23). This condition for answered prayer and its resulting fullness of joy is not just a formula with which to end a prayer. “In my name” implies representing Him and what He stands for, so that our prayer could truly be His prayer as well.

For example, our prayer must be in His will. “If we ask any thing according to his will . . . we know that we have the petitions that we desired of him” (1 John 5:14-15).

We need also to recognize that God’s great purpose in creation is of higher priority than our own personal desires, so this should be of first order in our prayers. Jesus said: “When ye pray, say, Our Father . . . . Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, as in heaven, so in earth” (Luke 11:2). We can also pray for our own needs, of course, especially for God to “deliver us from evil” (Luke 11:4), the closing request in His model prayer.

It is good to seek God’s wisdom in all our decisions and undertakings, so that we can be confident we are indeed in His will, but our request for such guidance must be sincere and in willingness to act on His answer. “If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God . . . . But let him ask in faith” (James 1:5-6). And it should be obvious that the request be made with a clear conscience before God. “If I regard iniquity in my heart, the Lord will not hear me” (Psalm 66:18).

But when we are indeed confident that we are praying “in His name” with all that this implies, then we should pray earnestly, for “the effectual fervent prayer of a righteous man availeth much” (James 5:16), and when the answer comes—as it will, in God’s time—then our joy indeed will be full! HMM
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