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16  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: June 07, 2018, 07:42:19 AM
Your New Authority

“And Jesus came and spake unto them, saying, All power is given unto me in heaven and in earth. Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost.” (Matthew 28:18-19)

Israel’s high priest wore the inscription “Holiness to the LORD” to illustrate to all who obeyed God that they were “accepted before the LORD” (Exodus 28:36-38). High priest Joshua, as a type of all believers, was granted “places to walk” in the courts of God (Zechariah 3:7). Christ’s disciples were commanded to ask the Father for whatsoever since they were chosen and ordained to “go and bring forth fruit” (John 15:16). We can “ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find; knock, and it shall be opened unto you” (Matthew 7:7).

But there’s more! Not only are we accepted, we are “sealed with that holy Spirit of promise” (Ephesians 1:13). We are “stablish[ed] . . . anointed . . . sealed” (2 Corinthians 1:21-22). We are confirmed in everything (1 Corinthians 1:4-8), consecrated and sanctified to serve (1 John 2:27), and given the Spirit as an “earnest [down payment, deposit] of our inheritance” (Ephesians 1:14).

The Holy Spirit does His work through a threefold ministry in our lives. He will work on Christ’s behalf, through our witness, to bring conviction to those not yet in Christ (John 16:7-11). He will also minister to us as the teacher of our spirit to guide us into all truth (John 14:17, 26; 15:26; 16:13). Furthermore, the wisdom, prudence, and knowledge of God are revealed to us through His work in us (1 Corinthians 2:9-10). All that is necessary for our “effectual working” (Ephesians 3:7) is graced to us so that we can “work out [our] own salvation” (Philippians 2:12). We are “complete in him” (Colossians 2:10). HMM III
17  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: June 06, 2018, 08:21:46 AM
Your New Purpose

“I therefore, the prisoner of the Lord, beseech you that ye walk worthy of the vocation wherewith ye are called.” (Ephesians 4:1)

We are called “out of darkness into his marvellous light” (1 Peter 2:9). Our calling is identified as heavenly (Hebrews 3:1) and upward (Philippians 3:14), and we are told that “the called” (Romans 1:6) are called “according to his purpose” (Romans 8:28). But we are also told to “give diligence to make [our] calling and election sure” (2 Peter 1:10). There is much in Scripture about our calling, and although the calling is God’s work and prerogative, we are expected to “add to [our] faith virtue; and to virtue knowledge; and to knowledge temperance; and to temperance patience; and to patience godliness; and to godliness brotherly kindness; and to brotherly kindness charity” (2 Peter 1:5-7).

We are “called to be saints” (Romans 1:7). That is, the purpose for which we have been invited by God to become one of His chosen is to be holy! Everything in our lifestyle should center on the fact that “we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good works” (Ephesians 2:10). Other aspects of our calling are the results of that holy character that should be the ever-controlling dominant factor in our lives.

The specifically cited traits in this context are attitudes of lowliness (see Philippians 2:1-3) and meekness (see Colossians 3:12-17), all the while “endeavouring to keep the unity of the Spirit” (Ephesians 4:3). A summary of this calling is found in Paul’s closing comment to the Corinthian church: “Be perfect [complete], be of good comfort, be of one mind, live in peace; and the God of love and peace shall be with you” (2 Corinthians 13:11). HMM III
18  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: June 05, 2018, 10:06:33 AM
Your New Nature

“. . . that we should be holy and without blame before him in love.” (Ephesians 1:4)

In the grand purpose of our selection into God’s family, two key words are used.

Holy: The word “holy” (Greek hagios) is the most frequently used descriptor about God’s twice-born. It stresses dedication. A holy man or woman is distinctively God’s, set apart for God’s use, separated from the secular, and consecrated to God’s service. All who are chosen are to be holy. The Colossians Christians were told to mortify the physical appetite, put off the sinful mental attitudes and habits, and “put on the new man . . . as the elect of God, holy and beloved” (Colossians 3:10-12). The focus is character.

Without Blame: “Without blame” refers to our reputation. This will only be finally realized in heaven (1 Corinthians 1:8), but there is a present responsibility to “present your bodies a living sacrifice . . . . And be not conformed to this world: but be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind” (Romans 12:1-2). The character of holiness is the cause for a lifestyle of blamelessness. We are to be the “sons of God, without rebuke, in the midst of a crooked and perverse nation, among whom ye shine as lights in the world” (Philippians 2:15).

This holy and blameless condition will result in “the praise of the glory of his grace” (Ephesians 1:6), where God will “gather together in one all things in Christ” (Ephesians 1:10). What a magnificent thought! The purpose for which we have been chosen, predestined, redeemed, and forgiven is to be holy in character and blameless in reputation so that when God gathers us all together in Christ, we will be the praise of the glorious grace of God! HMM III
19  Theology / Debate / Re: DOES JESUS HAVE THE BLOOD OF MARY WHEN HE WAS BORN ?? on: June 05, 2018, 10:05:15 AM
I will not get into a debate over this with you. Too many people over think this with the intent to question His divinity. I will also say quite definitively that scripture is quite clear. The answers are there if one but reads it with the spirit of God. Jesus was both fully man and fully God. The Bible states that it was so and that was of a necessity for the requirement of salvation for all. A good place to start in this study is in Hebrews 2.
20  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: June 04, 2018, 09:19:42 AM
Your New Position

“He hath chosen us in him before the foundation of the world, that we should be holy and without blame before him in love.” (Ephesians 1:4)

The search for identity and meaning can drive one to great successes or tragic failures. However, for the Christian the question is answered through the Scriptures.

Chosen: You are selected as a favorite out of “many [who] are called” (Matthew 22:14) “out of the world” (John 15:19). What a privilege! You are God’s choice to bear His name, represent His cause, and share His glory throughout eternity. In fact, you are “predestinated [previous boundaries set] . . . unto the adoption of children by Jesus Christ to himself” (Ephesians 1:5). And “if children, then heirs; heirs of God, and joint-heirs with Christ” (Romans 8:17).

Accepted: Furthermore, you are “accepted in the beloved” (Ephesians 1:6). That word “accepted” is a specialized form of the word most often translated “grace.” You are “graced” by almighty God, who set absolute boundaries around your life and made you His child. You are purchased “through his blood” (Ephesians 1:7) “that he might redeem us from all iniquity, and purify unto himself a peculiar [precious] people, zealous of good works” (Titus 2:14).

Forgiven: Moreover, you are forgiven (Ephesians 1:7)! Your sins are covered (Psalm 32:1), cast behind God’s back (Isaiah 38:17), removed “as far as the east is from the west” (Psalm 103:12), remembered no more (Jeremiah 31:34), as He has “cleanse[d] us from all unrighteousness” (1 John 1:9).

If you are God’s child, you should have no identity crises. You are a chosen, predestined, accepted, redeemed, and forgiven holy one, predestined “to be conformed to the image of his Son” (Romans 8:29). HMM III
21  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: June 03, 2018, 08:46:30 AM
Your Present Identity

“Now therefore ye are no more strangers and foreigners, but fellowcitizens with the saints, and of the household of God.” (Ephesians 2:19)

Prior to salvation, we are called “aliens . . . and strangers from the covenants of promise, having no hope, and without God in the world” (Ephesians 2:12). But now we are a “new man” and part of the grand partnership that has been made possible between Jew and Gentile, old and new covenant saints, and the operative impact and purpose of the “household of God” (Ephesians 2:13, 19).

We are brought near and made one. The enemy has been abolished, with the “middle wall of partition” that was between us broken down (Ephesians 2:13-15), making us “one body” with common “access by one Spirit unto the Father” (Ephesians 2:16-18).

Therefore, we are “fellowcitizens . . . of the household of God” (see 1 Timothy 3:15), built on the foundation of the apostles and prophets, “fitly framed together,” growing into a holy temple “for an habitation of God through the Spirit” (Ephesians 2:19-22), now displayed in a fellowship of past and present, bond and free, male and female, all new “partakers of his promise in Christ by the gospel” (Galatians 3:22-29; Ephesians 3:1-6).

Notice that “now unto the principalities and powers in heavenly places might be known by the church the manifold wisdom of God” (Ephesians 3:10). This enormous impact is “according to the eternal purpose which he purposed in Christ Jesus our Lord” (Ephesians 3:11).

God has designed His salvation for you in such a way that you cannot fail to achieve His plans for you! You should humbly thank Him for what He has accomplished in you through Jesus Christ. HMM III
22  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: June 02, 2018, 08:23:22 AM
Your Past Condition

“And you hath he quickened, who were dead in trespasses and sins.” (Ephesians 2:1)

Three concise descriptions are given in Scripture of how God sees all sinners prior to the creation of the second birth in us.

    We were dead in trespasses (activities) and sins (character, attitude, condition). The result was that we were unable to understand or seek God on our own (Romans 3:10-11). Nor are we able to know the things of God by our own intellectual prowess (1 Corinthians 2:14).

    We “walked according to the course of this world” (Ephesians 2:2), in bondage to the world (Galatians 4:3) and blinded by Satan (2 Corinthians 4:3-4).

    We are by “nature the children of wrath” (Ephesians 2:3). Both our natural desires (Ephesians 5:5-6) and our willing unbelief (John 3:36) put us under an ever-increasing wrathful judgment of God (Romans 2:5-9).

The transformation performed by God on us can only be “his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus” (Ephesians 2:10). It involves God’s rich mercy and great love (Ephesians 2:4) to make us alive when we were dead (see John 5:21-24; Romans 6:4-6, 9-11). That power raises and seats us with God in the heavens (Ephesians 2:6). That grace is effected through faith, and even “that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God: not of works, lest any man should boast” (Ephesians 2:8-9).

Whatever being twice-born may ultimately involve, it assures us of permanent status as the chosen, holy ones of God (Romans 8:29-39), “that in the ages to come he might shew the exceeding riches of his grace in his kindness toward us through Christ Jesus” (Ephesians 2:7). HMM III
23  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: June 01, 2018, 07:14:35 AM
Places to Walk

“Thus saith the LORD of hosts; If thou wilt walk in my ways, and if thou wilt keep my charge, then thou shalt also judge my house, and shalt also keep my courts, and I will give thee places to walk among these that stand by.” (Zechariah 3:7)

In one vision given to Zechariah, Joshua the high priest is shown standing before the awesome throne in heaven. He is pictured as being clothed in filthy garments next to the angel who brought him. Satan was there with all his power, trying to resist everything Joshua was doing. Of course, the Lord was there too and rebuked Satan, calling Joshua “a brand plucked out of the fire” (Zechariah 3:2).

What follows in the vision is a beautiful picture of what God does for us when we are twice-born. The Lord commands the angels to “take away the filthy garments” because, He says, “I have caused thine iniquity to pass from thee, and I will clothe thee with change of raiment.” The attendants quickly “set a fair mitre upon his head, and clothed him with garments” (Zechariah 3:4-5).

When we are created by God as a “new man” while down here on Earth, the spirit is changed, along with a new heart and a new mind, but one day we will be clothed in fine linen that represents the righteousness of the saints (Revelation 19:8)—all given to us when we were made righteous by the marvelous grace of our Lord Jesus.

What Zechariah is shown about the Joshua of old is the vast promises of a close working relationship with the Creator Himself—judging His house, having charge of His courts, and being given “places to walk” among the great personages of the courts of heaven. This is a picture of what it means to be a twice-born child of God. At the most basic of biblical foundations, a Christian has been identified by the Creator as one He desires to spend eternity with! HMM III
24  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: May 31, 2018, 09:40:39 AM
All in All

“Because I will publish the name of the LORD: ascribe ye greatness unto our God. He is the Rock, his work is perfect: for all his ways are judgment: a God of truth and without iniquity, just and right is he.” (Deuteronomy 32:3-4)

It is a thrilling exercise to note all the holy and gracious attributes attached to the name of God by the writers of Holy Scripture. In our text, for example, taken from the song of Moses, God is called a “God of truth.” According to the prophet Isaiah, the Lord is a “God of judgment” (Isaiah 30:18).

David called God both the “God of my righteousness” and “the God of salvation” (Psalms 4:1; 68:20).

In the New Testament, Stephen called Him “the God of glory” (Acts 7:2). Paul called Him both “the God of hope” and “the God of patience and consolation” (Romans 15:5, 13) when he wrote to the persecuted believers in the great capital of the Roman Empire.

To the carnal Christians in Corinth, He was called “the God of all comfort” and “the God of love and peace” (2 Corinthians 1:3; 13:11), and to the suffering believers in Philippi, Paul identified Him as “the God of peace” (Philippians 4:9).

The apostle Peter called Him “the God of all grace” (1 Peter 5:10), and the writer of Hebrews recognized Him as both “God the judge of all” and “the God of peace” (Hebrews 12:23; 13:20).

Our God is, indeed, the God who is all in all to His people. He is the God of truth and righteousness, of peace and love, of patience and comfort, of hope and grace, glory, and salvation. “Great and marvelous are thy works, Lord God Almighty; just and true are thy ways, thou King of saints” (Revelation 15:3). Is He, above all, “Lord of all” in us who know Him? HMM
25  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: May 30, 2018, 08:33:50 AM
That I May Know Him

“That I may know him, and the power of his resurrection, and the fellowship of his sufferings, being made conformable unto his death.” (Philippians 3:10)

Paul deeply desired to know Christ in an intimate fashion—to experience an even deeper relationship. In our text, he lists three things that will also be known if we know Christ.

The power of His resurrection: The victory of Christ over sin and death exhibited His great power. Paul not only longed for an ultimate resurrected body, “if by any means I might attain unto the resurrection of the dead” (v. 11), but he longed for the power over sin as well, “to be dead indeed unto sin, but alive unto God through Jesus Christ our Lord” (Romans 6:11).

The fellowship of His sufferings: Paul’s desire to know Christ was so great he was willing, if need be, to suffer as He suffered. And, indeed, Paul did suffer in many ways (as seen in 2 Corinthians 11:23-27 and elsewhere). “For even hereunto were ye called: because Christ also suffered for us, leaving us an example, that ye should follow his steps” (1 Peter 2:21). “If so be that we suffer with him, that we may be also glorified together” (Romans 8:17).

Being made conformable to His death: Paul was willing to die as Christ died and soon did die a martyr’s death, beheaded in a Roman prison. But that is not in view here. Rather, he wanted to be like Christ in His death, gaining complete victory over all sin. “For he that is dead is freed from sin” (Romans 6:7).

To know Christ in this way, to be conformed to Him as Paul desired, primarily demands developing the servant’s heart and selfless humility that took Christ to the cross (Philippians 2:5-8) to make it possible for us to know Him. JDM
26  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: May 29, 2018, 07:53:31 AM
The Faithful Saying

“It is a faithful saying: For if we be dead with him, we shall also live with him: If we suffer, we shall also reign with him: if we deny him, he also will deny us: If we believe not, yet he abideth faithful: he cannot deny himself.” (2 Timothy 2:11-13)

This saying may have been a song or other memory device that Paul recommended as a summary of doctrine. It expresses important elements of saving faith. First, Christ’s vicarious death gives us eternal life in Him. We “who were dead in trespasses and sins” (Ephesians 2:1) have been created “in righteousness and true holiness” (Ephesians 4:24) and have “passed from death unto life” (John 5:24).

Second, standing with Christ in this life attests to our reigning with Him in the next. The “persecutions and tribulations that [we] endure” are a “manifest token of the righteous judgment of God, that [we] may be counted worthy of the kingdom of God, for which [we] also suffer” (2 Thessalonians 1:4-5).

Also, denying Christ in this life will ensure that He will deny us for eternity. “Whosoever shall deny me before men, him will I also deny before my Father which is in heaven” (Matthew 10:33). “He that overcometh, the same shall be clothed in white raiment; and I will not blot out his name out of the book of life, but I will confess his name before my Father, and before his angels” (Revelation 3:5).

Finally, even our unbelief will not affect Christ’s faithfulness. “For all the promises of God in him are yea, and in him Amen” (2 Corinthians 1:20). “Thy word is true from the beginning: and every one of thy righteous judgments endureth for ever” (Psalm 119:160). “For I am the LORD, I change not” (Malachi 3:6).

May this faithful saying be your foundation in faith. It is a guide to salvation and an anchor for eternity. HMM III
27  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: May 28, 2018, 08:26:38 AM
Christian Freedom

“For, brethren, ye have been called unto liberty; only use not liberty for an occasion to the flesh, but by love serve one another.” (Galatians 5:13)

Liberty has always been a cherished concept to Americans, ever since the patriotic call of Patrick Henry for liberty or death. It was also a burning issue with the Jews at the time of Christ, chafing under Roman rule as they were. Many early Christians were actually slaves or even in prison for their faith. All those in bondage have longed to be free, and wars and revolutions have been fought to gain their freedoms.

But the worst bondage of all is slavery to sin. No army can free a man from sin, and if he dies in sin, he will continue in bondage forever. Among the last words of the Bible are these: “He that is unjust, let him be unjust still: and he which is filthy, let him be filthy still” (Revelation 22:11).

It is only Christ who can set a sinner free. Christ died for our sins, and through faith in Him we receive full pardon and liberty. “Our old man is crucified with him, that the body of sin might be destroyed, that henceforth we should not serve sin. For he that is dead is freed from sin. . . . Being then made free from sin, ye became the servants of righteousness” (Romans 6:6-7, 18).

There is no greater or truer freedom than freedom in Christ. “If the Son therefore shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed” (John 8:36). Because of Christ, the very creation itself, now groaning and travailing in pain under the curse of sin, one day soon “shall be delivered from the bondage of corruption into the glorious liberty of the children of God” (Romans 8:21).

In Christ we now have freedom to live unto righteousness. “Being made free from sin, and become servants to God, ye have your fruit unto holiness, and the end everlasting life” (Romans 6:22). HMM
28  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: May 27, 2018, 08:21:26 AM
At God's Good Pleasure

“But our God is in the heavens: he hath done whatsoever he hath pleased.” (Psalm 115:3)

We often raise questions about God’s actions, but He is never obligated to explain to us His reasons. It is enough to know that it pleased Him, for whatever He does is right by definition.

For example, if someone asks why God created the universe, we must answer simply that it was for His “pleasure they are and were created” (Revelation 4:11). “Whatsoever the LORD pleased, that did he in heaven, and in earth, in the seas, and all deep places” (Psalm 135:6). He does not have to give account to us, for we also were created at His pleasure.

And why did He allow His Son to suffer and die on the cross? Although “he had done no violence, neither was any deceit in his mouth. Yet it pleased the LORD to bruise him” and to “make his soul an offering for sin,” knowing that eventually “the pleasure of the LORD shall prosper in his hand” (Isaiah 53:9-10).

We may never be able to understand why God has done this, especially for sinners such as us, but we don’t have to understand. “It pleased God . . . to save them that believe” (1 Corinthians 1:21), not them that understand.

We can be sure that God does have perfect reasons for everything He does, and perhaps we shall understand it all in eternity. In the meantime, we are simply (with Paul) to be thankful that “it pleased God, who . . . called me by his grace, To reveal his Son in me” (Galatians 1:15-16). He has, in some way beyond comprehension, “predestinated us unto the adoption of children by Jesus Christ to himself, according to the good pleasure of his will” (Ephesians 1:5), and that is enough to know for now. HMM
29  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: May 26, 2018, 08:20:47 AM
What Is Sin

“Whosoever committeth sin transgresseth also the law: for sin is the transgression of the law.” (1 John 3:4)

The Bible warns that “the wages of sin is death” (Romans 6:23), and “the soul that sinneth, it shall die” (Ezekiel 18:20). These are strange days, however, and there are many “that call evil good, and good evil” (Isaiah 5:20). Who is to say what is right and wrong, when even our U.S. Supreme Court implies that there are no absolutes?

God is the one who defines sin because it is He who will judge sin. The definition is multifaceted, for sin takes many forms. Most basically, as our text says, sin is the transgression of the law—not just certain laws but all of God’s law. “For whosoever shall keep the whole law, and yet offend in one point, he is guilty of all” (James 2:10).

But there must be more than just formal obedience to God’s commands, for “all unrighteousness is sin” (1 John 5:17). Furthermore, there are sins of omission as well as sins of commission. “To him that knoweth to do good, and doeth it not, to him it is sin” (James 4:17).

When there is no specific law or command to guide our actions in a particular situation, the principle to follow is that of faith—that is, the confident inward assurance that we are doing that which honors the Lord, for “whatsoever is not of faith is sin” (Romans 14:23).

There is much more that could be noted, but it is clear that no one could ever measure up even to these demands, “for all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God” (Romans 3:23). All of us deserve the wages of sin, “but God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us” (Romans 5:8). Now “the righteousness of God without the law is manifested. . . . Even the righteousness of God which is by faith of Jesus Christ” (Romans 3:21-22). HMM
30  Theology / Bible Study / Re: A Daily Devotional on: May 25, 2018, 08:00:10 AM
The Whole Law

“Ye shall therefore keep my statutes, and my judgments: which if a man do, he shall live in them: I am the LORD.” (Leviticus 18:5)

The absolute holiness of God is emphasized throughout the book of Leviticus, and this is the standard for all those created in His image. This is made clear, beyond question, when today’s verse is quoted in the New Testament: “But that no man is justified by the law in the sight of God, it is evident: for, the just shall live by faith. And the law is not of faith: but, the man that doeth them shall live in them” (Galatians 3:11-12).

It is not enough that a man keep most of God’s laws. “For whosoever shall keep the whole law, and yet offend in one point, he is guilty of all” (James 2:10). “Cursed is every one that continueth not in all things which are written in the book of the law to do them” (Galatians 3:10).

It is obvious, therefore, that while “the law is holy, and the commandment holy, and just, and good” (Romans 7:12), no human being (except Jesus Christ) has ever been able to keep God’s perfect law, and all are therefore under God’s condemnation. “Therefore by the deeds of the law there shall no flesh be justified in his sight: for by the law is the knowledge of sin” (Romans 3:20).

The widespread delusion that a person can be saved by good works is dangerous, and many are on the road to hell smug in their supposed goodness. To keep the law, however, the Creator Himself had to become man, and He did fulfill the law as our representative before God. Then, when He died, Christ “redeemed us from the curse of the law, being made a curse for us” (Galatians 3:13). “Now the righteousness of God without the law is manifested . . . by faith of Jesus Christ unto all and upon all them that believe” (Romans 3:21-22). HMM
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